“Not I, said…”

The Little Red Hen was my absolutely favorite childhood story. My mother had a folktales & fables compilation book (that looked straight out of a early 70’s flea market stand! Peace, Mom!) that I looked at repeatedly as a child. In fact, The Little Red Hen portion of the overly thick book showed the most wear and tear.

“Let’s Start with the Side”

Book: The Little Red Hen by Carol Ottolenghi (or any other classic version of the story)

Age Level: Approximately age 3-8

Side Dish Reading for Mom & Dad: Parent Involvement in Early Literacy by Erika Burton. It is a terrific, short read for any parent! Please take the time to click on the hyperlink within the article (“a 2007 report by National Endowment for the Arts”) — the statistics are staggering…and troubling.

Literacy Activities:

(All of the activities for this section this week were found from PBSkids.org – BETWEEN THE LIONS Early Literacy Activity Guide)

Before Reading the Book:

  • Preview the Story – Read aloud the title of the story. Next, explain to your child that it is about a little red hen who asks her animal friends to help her make bread. Then ask the following questions:
    • Have you ever helped to cook or bake something?
    • Who did you help? What did you cook or bake?
  • Show the cover of the book and point to the words as you read the title. Name the author and illustrator aloud. Define and explain the terms author and illustrator.

While Reading the Book:

  • Pause reading when the little red hen asks who will help her plant the wheat, who will help her bake the bread, etc. Ask your child to predict what the little red hen’s friends will say.
  • Pause reading when the little red hen asks her friends if they will help her eat the bread. Ask your child what they think her friends will say? Ask your child what they think the little red hen will do (i.e. share or not share)?

After Reading the Book:

  • Ask and discuss the following questions with your child:
    • Have you ever helped to cook or bake something?
    • What did you think of the story? What part did you like best?
    • Why do you think the little red hen’s friends didn’t want to help her? What were they doing while the little red hen was working?
    • What do you think the little red hen’s friends will do the next time she asks them to help? Why do you think that?
    • What would you do if your friend asked you to help make something?
  • As an extension activity at the end of the story, explain that one way to let someone know how you feel about their help is with a thank-you card. Model the process by writing a thank you card to someone who has helped you, preferably someone your child knows. As you write, talk about the parts of a letter (greeting, message, and closing). Think aloud as you write your message. Write the helper’s name and address on an envelope and show your child how to put the card in the envelope. Encourage children to think about a friend or grownup who has helped them and whom they would like to thank. Your child can draw and write or dictate their thank-you messages to you. Help them write their names at the end, place their letters in an envelope and write their helper’s name on it. Talk to your child about how they can deliver their thank-you notes.

Parents, Add  A Side Dish of Literacy to Your Home:

While searching for this week’s article for parents, I stumbled upon this resource for parents/young children. I highly recommend that you check it out. Obviously, we all know the importance of limiting screen time and keeping screen time valuable. I love the Reading is Fundamental website so I was excited to find that they had a kids section. They have finger plays, short “explore” clips and other goodies for toddlers and preschoolers. I recommend exploring and using the website with your child to aid in their Web 2.0 literacy development. This past week in my graduate course we read Selecting “APP”ealing and “APP”ropriate Book Apps for Beginning Readers by Maria Cahill & Anne McGill-Franzen. If you have access to academic articles, I recommend you take the time to check it out. The article discusses how to appropriately choose book apps for beginning readers.

Finally there are signs of spring being displayed by Mother Nature in upstate New York. Because of my intense case of spring fever, I am also posting this super Summer Alphabet Book idea for parents to consider using.

Family Fun Activity:

“For the Main Dish”

The Recipe: Sweet Dinner Rolls. I realize this is not a main dish recipe but it correlates perfectly with this week’s book. Plus, it is always a terrific experience for little ones to take part in the baking process of yeast to dough to bread. And, let’s not forget the way freshly baked bread makes your home smell. #devine I make these dinner rolls religiously. They are superb and pretty much fail proof. If you eat one with real butter and honey, I promise you will want a second.

Enjoy your family dinner (eh, or for this week: bread!) and a side of literacy!

“Not I Said,”

Sara

References:

Burdick, S [Susan]. (n.d.). [Pinterest post]. Retrieved April 17, 2015 from https://www.pinterest.com/pin/82542605642761680/.

Burton, E. (2013, January). Parent involvement in early literacy. Retrieved April 17, 2015 from http://www.edutopia.org/blog/parent-involvement-in-early-literacy-erika-burton.

Koenig, K [Karen]. (n.d.). [Pinterest post]. Retrieved April 17, 2015 from https://www.pinterest.com/pin/82542605643683175/.

Norris, M. (2007, October). Sweet dinner rolls. Retrieved April 17, 2015 from http://www.browneyedbaker.com/sweet-dinner-rolls/.

Pace, P [Patricia]. (n.d.). [Pinterest post]. Retrieved April 17, 2015 from https://www.pinterest.com/pin/82542605642761741/.

PBS Kids (n.d.). Between the lions early literacy activity guide. Retrieved April 17, 2015 from  http://pbskids.org/lions/parentsteachers/pdf/ELAG_LittleRedHen.pdf.

Read Write Think (n.d.). Write summer alphabet books. Retrieved April 17, 2015 from http://www.readwritethink.org/parent-afterschool-resources/activities-projects/write-summer-alphabet-books-30165.html?main-tab=1#tabs.

Reading is Fundamental (n.d.).  Reading is leading. Retrieved April 17, 2015 from http://www.rif.org/kids/leadingtoreading/en/preschoolers/read.htm.

Rosin, K [Kelly]. (n.d.). [Pinterest post]. Retrieved April 17, 2015 from https://www.pinterest.com/pin/82542605643683489/.

…And the Big, Bad Shark!

This week I have chosen The Three Little Fish and the Big Bad Shark for everyone’s reading and dining enjoyment. I have this book memorized. Seriously. Memorized. I have read it and read it and read it again. However, this is not due to the two little girls toddling around our home. This book was a popular title in the preschool that I ran in Virginia. I thoroughly enjoyed reading it to the preschoolers – so many options for fun, silly voices. I am not sure if it was a class favorite because the children loved the book OR if they loved the book because I adored reading it. I assume the latter. Either way, it should be a winner for your family!

“Let’s Start with the Side”

Book: The Three Little Fish and the Big Bad Shark by Ken Geist

Age Level: Approximately age 4-8 (but, I believe it is best suited for 2-4 year olds).

Side Dish Reading for Mom & Dad:

This article may likely be a review of items you already know as a parent. However, it is always nice to have a refresher regarding these important home literacy ideas: Conversations That Count

In addition, below, you will find reading check-up lists specified by age that you can review with your child(ren) in mind. A great, user friendly, resource(s)!

Literacy Activities (given the age level of the book the majority of these activities are targeted for Pre-K children):

Before Reading the Book:

  • Read the title, author and illustrator aloud and discuss. Set purpose for listening with this guiding question: Why do the three fish need to build new homes?

While Reading the Book:

  • Periodically ask you child what they think will happen next in the story. Be sure to look at illustrations or foreshadowing clues.
  • As always, try to focus on a few new vocabulary words when reading this book with your child. These new words may include:
    • Gather (to bring things together).
    • Tremble (to shake and feel scared).
    • Worry (to feel upset).
    • Munch (to chew something).
    • Ship (a large boat).
    • Destroy (to smash and break apart).
    • If you followed my previous Dragons Love Tacos post, you could add some of these words to your word wall at home.
  • As you read the story ask questions like the examples listed below:
    • What did the mama say to her children?
    • What do you think will happen next?
    • What are Jim and Tim doing?
    • How is the ship different from the seaweed house and the sandy house?
    • Why do you think the shark wants to come in?
    • How does Jim feel?
    • Why did Jim and Tim swim away?
    • How is the ship different from the seaweed house and the sandy house?
    • Why did the shark’s teeth fall out?
    • Why do you think the shark can only eat soft foods like seaweed now?
  • Try to move beyond just having your child name objects in the pictures – ask them what is happening in the pictures.

After Reading the Book:

  • Try to lead your child through the process of retelling the story in their own words (you could use the shark clothes pin family fun idea listed below to aid in this activity).
  • Ask your child: Why did the three fish need to build new homes?
  • Ask your child: Which home was best for the fish and why?

Parents, Add  A Side Dish of Literacy to Your Home:  The last two weeks I have challenged you to add a word wall to your home and to add visual literacy strategies to your daily literacy routine. This week I would like you to consider: Visiting the library on a regular basis. Your family may already do this – good for you. Or, it is extremely possible given the craze and busyness of life, you simply don’t get to the library like you know you should. Start small. Make a goal to go every month, then twice a month, then maybe every week. The research shows repeatedly that visiting the library with child(ren) makes a large impact upon their literacy development.

Family Fun Activity:

“For the Main Dish”

The Recipe: Angel Hair Pasta with Scallops and Tomatoes

Our household loves Skinnytaste.com. Loves! I don’t believe we have made one recipe from this website that is not stellar. Gina’s recipes are not only yummy – but healthy! Bonus.

Obviously, I wanted to find a dish that little ones would enjoy and also incorporated some “seafood” to correlate with your underwater theme this week. We have made this dish for our toddler and she approved. Eh, I mean, it’s a dish with pasta – what kid wouldn’t approve? Full disclosure: we told her the scallops were turkey pieces. She bought it. #parentsoftheyear

Remember, this blog is about literacy, reading AND cooking as a family at least one night a week. So, please allow your little ones to help with the dinner preparation. A messy kitchen is a happy, family kitchen!

I am not a Pinterest Mom. In fact, I am extremely far from it. However, if you are in to that type of thing (good for you!), below are some cute Pinterest shark snack ideas. I don’t have the time to be this adorable, but if you do, rock on! J

Keep Munchin’ and Crunchin’ (Like The Shark!),

Sara

References:

Anderson, M. (2012, August). How to draw a cartoon shark – tutorial. Retrieved April 8, 2015 from https://www.andertoons.com/cartoon-blog/2012/08/how-to-draw-a-cartoon-shark-tutorial.html.

Bozman, N. [Nicole]. (n.d.). Kid fun [Pinterest post]. Retrieved April 8, 2015 from https://www.pinterest.com/pin/494762709032797004/.

Buskirk, K. (2012, July). Feed the shark alphabet game for kids. Retrieved April 8, 2015 from http://www.toddlerapproved.com/2014/07/feed-shark-alphabet-game-for-kids.html.

Catch my Party. (n.d.). The little mermaid birthday ideas [Pinterest post]. Retrieved April 8, 2015 from https://www.pinterest.com/pin/187884615679470735/.

Catch my Party. (n.d.). Under the sea birthday party ideas [Pinterest post]. Retrieved April 8, 2015 from https://www.pinterest.com/pin/479422322805142807/.

Duff, M. [Molly]. (n.d.). First birthday [Pinterest post]. Retrieved April 8, 2015 from https://www.pinterest.com/pin/138133913544949233/.

Get Ready to Read. (n.d.).  Promoting family literacy: raising ready readers. Retrieved April8, 2015 from http://www.getreadytoread.org/early-learning-childhood-basics/early-literacy/promoting-family-literacy-raising-ready-readers.

Homolka, G. (2013, February). Angel hair pasta with scallops and tomatoes. Retrieved April 8, 2015 from http://www.skinnytaste.com/2013/02/angel-hair-pasta-with-scallops-and.html.

Koralek, D. (n.d.). Conversations that count. Retrieved April 8, 2015 from http://www.rif.org/us/literacy-resources/articles/conversations-that-count.htm.

McInerney, M. (2014, January). Don’t wake the shark – matching pairs. Retrieved April 8, 2015 from http://mollymoocrafts.com/diy-matching-pairs/.

Neary, L. (2014, December). Talk, sing, read, write, play: how libraries reach kids before they can read. Retrieved April 8, 2015 from http://www.npr.org/2014/12/30/373783189/talk-sing-read-write-play-how-libraries-reach-kids-before-they-can-read.

Reading is Fundamental. (n.d.). Reading check-up lists. Retreived April 8, 2015 from http://www.rif.org/us/literacy-resources/articles/reading-checkup-for-babies-and-toddlers.htm.

Sandoval, M. [Meghan] (n.d.) Birthday inspiration [Pinterest post]. Retrieved April 8, 2015 from https://www.pinterest.com/pin/139963500889895708/.

Chop, Chop, Chopsticks!

Mo Willems likely wins the award for best author in our home. But, Amy Krouse Rosenthal is a close second. This week I have decided to use Chopsticks by Amy Krouse Rosenthal for the weekly Family Dinner with a Side of Literacy post.

“Let’s Start with the Side”

Book: Chopsticks by Amy Krouse Rosenthal

Age Level: Approximately age 4-8 (but our almost three-year-old ADORES it!).

Side Dish Reading for Mom & Dad: Reading for Two: A Double Challenge OR Using Think-Alouds to Improve Reading Comprehension. In my current graduate class the strategy of Think-Alouds was recently discussed. I truly feel this is a worthwhile strategy for teachers AND parents to complete with their children. There are plenty of sources on the web for parents to utilize and learn about this worthwhile reading comprehension strategy. One can even search a magnitude of YouTube videos that demonstrate how to successfully complete a Think-Aloud with a child. Seriously. Check it out!

Literacy Activities:

Before Reading the Book:

  • Read the title aloud and discuss. What are chopsticks? Where and who might use chopsticks? How does your child eat their food (i.e. fork, fingers, off of your floor, from the family pet’s dish, etc.)?

While Reading the Book:

  • Periodically ask you child what they think will happen next in the story. Be sure to look at illustrations or foreshadowing clues.
  • As always, try to focus on a few new vocabulary words when reading this book with your child. These new words may include chopsticks, venture, stumped, unusual, fancy, or culinary. If you followed my previous Dragons Love Tacos post, you could add some of these words to your word wall at home.
  • Depending on the age of your child, focus on discussing figurative language and multiple meanings words that are located in the book. For example, “attached at the hip,” “whisked away” (by a whisk), and “no one stirred, not even the spoon.”
  • Try to move beyond just having your child name objects in the pictures – ask them what is happening in the pictures. What are some of the kitchen utensils pictured in the book used for?

After Reading the Book:

  • Try to lead your child through the process of retelling the story in their own words. What happened to the chopsticks?
  • Further discuss the idea of together and apart. What are some common things individuals do alone? What are some common things people do together? What did the chopsticks do together and alone in the story?  This book lends itself for meaningful conversations about how being apart from a favorite family member, friend or thing can actually be a positive experience (even if scary!).
  • Depending on the age of your child, try to give further examples of figurative language beyond those examples in the story. Can they come up with an example of their own?

Parents, Add  A Side Dish of Literacy to Your Home:  Last week we discussed adding a word wall to your home. This week consider adding “visual literacy” to your home/family literacy routine.

Here are some sources for you to enjoy and further your knowledge about visual literacy AND it’s importance:

Family Fun Activity:

  • Amy Krouse Rosenthal has created an activity guide for her book Chopsticks. Check it out HERE.
  • In addition, a simple internet search retrieved THIS adorable arts and craft idea. Just grab some free chopsticks the next time you order Chinese, felt, googly eyes and pipe cleaners and voilà you have chopstick cuteness. This also creates a fun opportunity for children to “retell” the story to other family members.
  • As a family, take turns using a pair of chopsticks to pick up various items around the house. Who can be crowned the Chopstick King/Queen?

“For the Main Dish”

The Recipe: Shrimp with Thai Noodles and Peanut Sauce

Again, I would prefer to use some of my more gourmet spicy Asian recipes but this blog centers around “family dinners.” So, I went with a trusty household favorite from good ole’ Betty Crocker. I apologize for the peanut butter ingredient; I know peanut allergies are everywhere. But, if your family is lucky enough to be a family free of peanut allergies – this recipe should please the wee and big kiddos. At least the noodle and peanut butter part?

Be sure to include a set of chopsticks for everyone to use as they enjoy the meal!

Bring on the Chopstick fun,

Sara

References:

Bernard, K. (2012, February). Think aloud strategy. Retrieved April 1, 2015 from https://makingeducationfun.wordpress.com/2012/02/29/think-aloud-reading-strategy/.

Conner, J., Farr. R (n.d.). Using think-alouds to improve reading comprehension. Retrieved March 31, 2015 from http://www.readingrockets.org/article/using-think-alouds-improve-reading-comprehension.

Finley, T. (2014, February). Common core in action: ten visual literacy strategies. Retrieved March 30, 2015 from http://www.edutopia.org/blog/ccia-10-visual-literacy-strategies-todd-finley.

PBS Kids (n.d.). Reading to two: a double challenge. Retrieved from http://www.readingrockets.org/article/reading-two-double-challenge.

Shrimp with thai noodles and peanut sauce (n.d.). Retrieved March 31, 2015 from http://www.bettycrocker.com/recipes/shrimp-with-thai-noodles-and-peanut-sauce/56d68ec8-7327-4761-ab8e-e38cb5ac6f17.

Stephenson, S. (2014, September). Visual literacy through children’s picture books. Retrieved March 31, 2015 from http://www.scholastic.com/parents/blogs/scholastic-parents-learning-toolkit/visual-literacy-through-childrens-picture-books.

Stephenson, S. (2013, April). Visual literacy – investigate and play with images. Retrieved March 31, 2015 from http://www.thebookchook.com/2013/04/visual-literacy-investigate-and-play.html.

Yeh, K. (2013, October). Building speech and language with chopsticks. Retrieved March 31, 2015 from http://www.playingwithwords365.com/2012/10/building-speech-language-with-chopsticks/.

Dragons Don’t Eat Those Tacos!

I couldn’t resist. I just had to make the first Family Dinner with a Side of Literacy blog post using the popular children’s picture book Dragons Love Tacos by Adam Rubin. Our family adores it. Well, that, and tacos!

 “Let’s Start with the Side”

Book: Dragons Love Tacos by Adam Rubin

Age Level: Approximately age 2 – 7. This blog post & activities have primarily been crafted with pre-readers in mind.

Side Dish Reading for Mom & Dad: Getting the Most Out of Picture Books

Literacy Activities:

Before Reading the Book as a Family:

  • Play “What’s That?” Point to various object on the front cover (Dragon, Tacos, Letters) and ask the child what they think they are.
  • Read the title aloud and discuss what foods your child likes and dislikes.
  • Encourage your child to tell you what they think will happen in the story by simply looking at the front cover. You can aid in this endeavor by helping them look for foreshadowing clues that may have been left in the illustrations.

While Reading the Book as a Family:

  • Periodically ask you child what they think will happen next in the story. Be sure to look at illustrations and look for foreshadowing clues.
  • Try to move beyond just having your child name objects in the pictures – ask them what is happening in the illustrations.

After Reading the Book as a Family:

  • Questions to ask you Child:
    • What did the dragons do to the house?
    • Why did the house catch on fire?
    • What are some good toppings for tacos? What do you like on your tacos?
    • Have you ever eaten something spicy? What did it make your mouth feel like?
  • Try to lead your child through the process of retelling the story in their own words. What happened to those silly dragons?

Parents, Add  A Side Dish of Literacy to Your Home:  With a home that includes pre- and beginning readers word walls/labeling is a valuable tool to aid with vocabulary development. Word walls and labels aren’t simply for classrooms or teachers. Consider using a word wall in your own home.  Possibly start in your kitchen as you prepare tonight’s meal! Below you will find some resources for word walls.

 Family Fun Activity:

  1. Listen, dance and sing to the song Dragons Love Tacos. As a family, try to make up motions to the song.
  2. Play taco, taco, dragon (also known as duck, duck, goose – just change up the words!)
  3. Tell each other silly dragon jokes.
    1. Knock, knock!
      Who’s there?
      Taco!
      Taco who?
      I don’t want to taco about it.
    2. Knock, knock!
      Who’s there?
      Nacho who?
      That’s not ‘cho taco, and that’s not ‘cho dragon, either!
    3. Knock, knock!
      Who’s there?
      Thumping who?
      Thumping tells me we’ve told enough dragon and taco knock knock jokes.
    4. Knock, knock!
      Who’s there?
      Ben who?
      Ben waiting all day for a taco!
    5. Knock, knock!
      Who’s there?
      Olive who?
      Olive tacos.
    6. Nacho: Why will you not taco to me? > Taco: Because I’m nacho friend
    7. What sound do you hear when dragons eat spicy salsa? >A fire alarm
    8. Why are dragons good storytellers? > They all have tails
    9. Why did the chef feed the dragon spicy salsa? > She needed to barbeque some chicken

“For the Main Dish”

The Recipe:

Of course, there are some terrific taco recipes and toppings out there (Fish tacos, Tacos Carne Asada, Pico del Gallo, and let’s not forget about the other amazing cilantro and pepper infused toppings or amazing homemade shell recipes).  However, we are aiming to please the entire family tonight. So, for tonight’s family dinner we will be keeping the recipe extremely easy: American style beef tacos. Boring, maybe? If your children have a sophisticate pallet — by all means, up your game for tonight’s tacos. However, we will be going straight boring tonight to please our very picky toddler.

In the end, there really is no recipe to follow tonight. All you need is to assess your family’s likes and dislikes. Does your family only prefer the taco toppings like in the book (lettuce, cheese and tomato – great questions to ask your children while you cook!)?

Of course, the first Family Consumer Science step for any cooking endeavor would be for the entire family to wash their hands. Sing the Dragons love Tacos song the entire time you wash your hands to ensure that the germs are properly defeated!

  1. Brown your favorite meat (this is a job for Mom or Dad!).
  2. Add your preferred taco seasonings to the meat.
  3. Heat up you taco shells in the oven. This step could involve you child! Let them count the shells (math literacy!) and line them up on a baking sheet. Did they get enough for everyone in the family?
  4. Place all of your toppings in bowls (cheese, sour cream, tomatoes, taco sauce, guacamole, etc.) – another child friendly step!
  5. Allow each family member to build their tacos. Remember, a messy kitchen = a fun family night!
  6. Take a bite! But, if you want to eat your tacos, keep them away from the dragons!

For future posts, we will be incorporating, if you will, “real” recipes. But, for tonight, it’s simply about getting comfortable with having family dinner nights with a side of literacy!

Enjoy those tacos and I hope the dragons stay away,

Sara

References:

Dragons Love Tacos Song (n.d.). Retrieved March 14, 2015 from http://www.nbp.org/downloads/gep/dragon-song.mp3

Dunkerly, L (2002, January). Word wall games. Retrieved March 12, 2015 from http://www.state.nj.us/education/parents/articles/tips/wordwalls.htm.

Nace, F (n.d.). Word walls at home. Retrieved on March 12, 2015 from http://www.state.nj.us/education/parents/articles/tips/wordwalls.htm.

Getting the most out of picture books (n.d.). Retrieved March 12, 2015 from http://www.rif.org/us/literacy-resources/articles/getting-the-most-out-of-picture-books.htm

Tell Dragon Jokes (n.d.). Retrieved March 14, 2015 from, http://www.nbp.org/ic/nbp/programs/gep/dragon/ge_dragonjokes.html

Tyson, K. (2013, July). 5 Simple Steps for Effective Vocabulary Instruction. Retrieved March 14, 2015 from  http://www.learningunlimitedllc.com/2013/07/5-steps-vocabulary-instruction/

Tyson, K. (2012, December). Top Tips for Word Walls. Retrieved March 14, 2015 from http://www.learningunlimitedllc.com/2012/12/top-tips-for-word-walls/

Word wall ideas for classroom (n.d.) Retrieved on March 12, 2015 from https://www.pinterest.com/search/boards/?q=word+wall+idea+for+classroom.

The Who, What, Where and When of Family Dinner with a Side of Literacy.

Who: As a graduate from Kent State University in Family Consumer Science Career and Technical Education, I embarked upon my journey as a Family Consumer Science (FCS) educator in August of 2005. I taught Family Consumer Sciences in Danville, Virginia and Culpeper, Virginia for seven years. Specifically, I instructed the following high school courses: Parenting, Life Planning, Early Childhood I, Early Childhood II, Teachers for Tomorrow I, Teachers for Tomorrow II and Personal Development. I also served as the Career and Technical department chair/instructional team leader for three years. During my seven years of teaching, I was awarded Teacher of the Year in 2010 at Eastern View High School. In addition, I served as a Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) advisor for six years. Of those six years, I coached and mentored over 25 of our chapter’s members to the National FCCLA Star Events competition (Nashville 2009, Chicago 2010,California 2011) . Since then I have relocated, taken a break from the classroom as I raise our children while earning my Master’s in Literacy Education.

What & Where: As a Syracuse University graduate student in the course Perspectives on Literacy & Technology, I was tasked with completing an independent final project. That is exactly how this blog was born.

Blog Purpose: To serve as a resource for families, Family Consumer Science educators, Literacy educators, and quite possibly FCS students. If I were currently still in a Family Consumer Science classroom, I would implement this blog as a classroom tool/student project. Students would be shown a few model blog posts and it would be required that each student make one post throughout the semester. Their posts would have to include a children’s book, correlating family recipe that meets that week’s criteria and family/literacy expansion activities. This project could/would fit within multiple FCS course competencies (Parenting, Family Relations and Nutrition & Wellness to name a few!) .  Since I do not work in a classroom currently, at this point, I plan to make weekly posts that either could give current FCS or literacy professionals ideas (for personal use or classroom/student use). Furthermore, this blog can serve as a resource for any family with young children. The activities will allow families to take a vital and arguably necessary weekly “time-out” for togetherness while also helping their children’s literacy development.

Sit back, grab a picture book,  apron and enjoy your dinner!

The first family post should be posted in a week!

– Sara